Pharmacy Technician

Certification Exam Simulation Software

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Free Sample Questions


1. You were given a prescription to fill that included 30 ml of solution.  How much is 30ml in the metric system?

            a. 1g

            b. 1lb

            c. 1oz

            d. 1tsp

 

Answer: c

Explanation: According to the metric system 30ml = 1oz.

 

2. Your employee brings you a prescription written in metric units that contains 16 oz of liquid.  How much is 16 oz according to the metric system?

            a. 1 quart

            b. 1 pint

            c. 1 gallon

            d. 1 half-gallon

 

Answer: b

Explanation: According to the metric system 16oz = 1 pint.

 

3. You are trying to decipher a prescription that calls for 1pt of solution.  You need to convert the prescription to metric numbers.  How many ml are in 1 pint according to the metric system?

            a. 480

            b. 560

            c. 370

            d. 230

 

Answer: a

Explanation: According to the metric system, there are 480 ml in one pint.

 

4. You are showing two of your students how to fill some large liquid prescriptions.  One of them asks you how many ml are there in one gallon according to the metric system.  How do you answer?

            a. 2763

            b. 3986

            c. 2894

            d. 3840

 

Answer: d

Explanation: According to the metric system there are 3840ml in one gallon.

 

5. You are back at your pharmacy after a lengthy week spent in didactic sessions with your students teaching them all about the metric, avoirdupois, and apothecary systems.  An employee asks you how many gtts there are in one teaspoon.  What do you answer him?

            a. 100

            b. 40

            c. 60

            d. 80

 

Answer: c

Explanation: There are 60gtts in 1 tsp.

 

6. One of your employees asks you to help him fill a prescription of salts.  What is the formula for Eq for salts using only one chloride?

            a. Add the molecular weights and multiply by 1

            b. Subtract the molecular weights and divide by 1

            c. Add the molecular weights and divide by 1

            d. Subtract the molecular weights and multiply by 1

 

Answer: c

Explanation: By adding the molecular weights and dividing by 1 you have the formula for Eq for salts that use only 1 chloride.

 

7. The same employee asks you for the formula for Eq using multiple chlorides (A and B).  What is it?

            a. Add the molecular weights, then multiply the molecular weight of the chloride by the number of chlorides, and then divide by the number of valence electrons from A

            b. Subtract the molecular weights, then multiply the molecular weight of the chloride by the number of chlorides, and then subtract the number of valence electrons from A

            c. Add the number of valence electrons from A, then subtract the molecular weights, and then multiply the molecular weight of the chloride by the number of chlorides

            d. Subtract the number of valence electrons from A, then add the molecular weights, then multiply the molecular weight of the chloride by the number of chlorides

 

Answer: a

Explanation: To get the Eq using multiple chlorides, first add the molecular weights, then multiply the molecular weight of the chloride by the number of chlorides, then subtract the number of valence electrons from A.

 

8. You ask one of your students to tell you the formula for calculating mEq with multiple chlorides.  What should he answer?

            a. Multiply the Eq by 1000

            b. Divide the Eq by 1000

            c. Multiply the Eq by 100

            d. Divide the Eq by 100

 

Answer: b

Explanation: To get the mEq for multiple chlorides, divide the Eq by 1000.

 

9. You ask a student to tell you what happens to the decimal when you are using division if it moves 10 to the left.  What does he answer?

            a. Multiply (/) by 10

            b. Divide (/) by 5

            c. Divide (/) by 10

            d. Multiply (/) by 5

 

Answer: c

Explanation: When using division, if a decimal moves 10 to the left, divide (/) by 10.

 

10. You ask the same student what happens to the decimal when you are using multiplication if it moves 10 to the left.  What should he answer?

            a. Multiply (*) by 10

            b. Divide (*) by 5

            c. Multiply (*) by 5

            d. Divide (*) by 10

 

Answer: a

Explanation: When using multiplication, if a decimal moves 10 to the left, multiply (*) by 10.

 

11. You give your students a formula to convert Fahrenheit temperatures to Celsius.  What is that formula?

            a. Degrees in Celsius = Degrees in Fahrenheit -32

            b. Degrees in Celsius = Degrees in Fahrenheit -32 X 5/9

            c. Degrees in Celsius = Degrees in Fahrenheit – 32 X 5/8

            d. Degrees in Celsius = Degrees in Fahrenheit + 32

 

Answer: b

Explanation: To get the temperature in Celsius take the temperature in Fahrenheit, subtract 32, and multiply by 5/9.

 

12. Your students then ask you how to convert Celsius temperatures into Fahrenheit.  What is the formula you give them?

            a. Degrees in Fahrenheit = Degrees in Celsius + 32 X 5/9

            b. Degrees in Fahrenheit = Degrees in Celsius + 32 divided by 5/9

            c. Degrees in Fahrenheit = Degrees in Celsius X 9/5 + 32

            d. Degrees in Fahrenheit = Degrees in Celsius X 5/9 + 32

 

Answer: c

Explanation: To get the temperature in Fahrenheit take the temperature in Celsius, multiply it by 9/5 and add 32

 

13) One of your employees needs to fill a child’s prescription and only has the adult dose.  He asks you what Clark’s Rule is for calculating children’s dosage.  What do you tell him?

            a. Take the age of the child, divide it by the age of the child plus 12 and multiply it by the adult dose

            b. Take the adult dose X the weight of the child and subtract 150

            c. Take the age of the child, divide it by 12, and multiply that by the adult dose

            d. Take the adult dose X (the weight of the child/150)

 

Answer: d

Explanation: Clark’s Rule for calculating children’s dosages is adult dose X (child’s weight/150)

 

14. You tell your employee that he can also calculate the dosage using Young’s Rule.  What is Young’s Rule?

            a. (Adult dose/150) X weight of child

            b. Years of child age/(age of child + 12) X adult dose

            c. Age of child/(age of adult – 12) X adult dose

            d. (Age of child + 12)/age of adult X years of child’s age

 

Answer: b

Explanation: Young’s Rule for calculating children’s dosages is years of child’s age/(age of child + 12) X adult dose.

 

15. You tell your employee that there is also a basic way of calculating children’s dosages.  What is it?

 

a. Take adult dose and divide it by the conversion factor (1.7)

b. Take the adult dose and multiply it by the conversion factor (1.7)

c. Take the adult dose, divide by the conversion factor( 1.7) and subtract 12

d. Take the adult dose, multiply by the conversion factor (1/7) and subtract 12

 

Answer: a

Explanation: The basic way to calculate children’s dosages is to take the adult dose and divide it by the conversion factor of 1.7.

 

16. You are teaching your students how to read prescription formulas.  In ratios of concentration, the number to the left of the column always means what?

            a. grains

            b. milliliters

            c. grams

            d. micrograms

 

Answer: c

Explanation: The number to the left of the column always means the number of grams.

 

17. Your students ask you what the meaning is of the number to the right of the column in the prescription formula.  What is your answer?

            a. grains

            b. milliliters

            c. liters

            d. micrograms

 

Answer: b

Explanation: In prescription formulas, the number to the right of the column always means milliliters.

 

18. You ask your students what percentages of concentration express in a formula.  What should be their answer?

            a. weight per volume, density per volume, and volume per weight

            b. weight per density, volume per density, and weight per weight

            c. weight per volume, volume per volume, and weight per weight

            d. Volume per density, weight per density, and volume per volume

 

Answer: c

Explanation: The percentages of concentration mean weight per volume (g/100ml), volume per volume (ml/100ml), and weight per weight (e.g. gm/100gm)

 

19. You have a new employee at your pharmacy and you are reviewing units of measure with him.  What is the formula for converting between units of measure?

            a. Units on hand + (units of order/units on hand)

            b. Units of order X (units of order/units on hand)

            c. Units on hand X (units of order/units on hand)

            d. Units of order + units of order/units on hand

 

Answer: c

Explanation: The formula for converting between units of measure is units on hand X (units of order/units on hand).

 

20. You tell the same employee there is another formula for converting between units of measure called the plain version.  What is this formula?

            a. Units that you have X # of units desired/units that you have

            b. # of units desired X units that you have/# of units desired

            c. Units that you have divided by (units that you have/# of units desired)

            d. Units that you have X (units that you have/# of units desired)

 

Answer: a

Explanation: The plain version of the formula for converting units of measure is units that you have X # of units desired/units that you have.

 

21. Your employee asks you what is the percent solution formula.  What do you answer?

            a. volume wanted/% needed = volume prescribed/%wanted

            b. volume needed/% wanted = volume prescribed/% have

            c. volume needed/%needed = volume prescribed/% have

            d. volume needed/%wanted = % have/volume prescribed

 

Answer: b

Explanation: The percent solution formula is volume needed/% wanted = volume prescribed/5 have.

 

22. You are instructing a class on the meaning of ratios in prescriptions.  What are the most commonly encountered ratios in terms of mg/ml with respect to 1:1000, 1:100, and 1:10?

            a. 1:1000 = 100 mg/ml, 1:100 = 10mg/ml, 1:10 = 1mg/ml

            b. 1:1000 = 10 mg/ml, 1:100 = 1 mg/ml, 1:10 = -1mg/ml

            c. 1:1000 = 1 mg/ml, 1:100 = 10 mg/ml, 1:10 = 100 mg/ml

            d. 1:1000 = 100 mg/ml, 1:100 = 1 mg/ml, 1:10 = -1mg/ml

 

Answer: c

Explanation: 1:1000 = 1 mg/ml, 1:100 = 10 mg/ml, 1:10 = 100 mg/ml

 

23. Your employee asks you how to calculate volume from a ratio with mg strength given.  What do you tell him the formula for calculating this is?

            a. (x mg/y mg/ml) = z ml dispensed

            b. x mg X y mg/ml = z ml dispensed

            c. x ml X y mg/ml = z ml dispensed

            d. x mg/ml X y mg = z ml dispensed

 

Answer: a

Explanation: The formula for calculating volume from a ration with mg strength given is (x mg/y mg/ml) = z ml dispensed.

 

24. The same employee asks you for help calculating the dose received from a

patient for x ml of a y:1000 solution.  What do you tell him to do?

            a. First he must convert the stock to mg/ml.  Then he takes x ml X y ml to obtain z mg

            b. First he must convert the stock to mg/ml.  Then he takes x ml X y mg reduced/ml to obtain z mg, making sure that the like units cancel

            c. First he must convert the stock to mg/ml.  Then he takes x mg X y ml reduced/mg to obtain z mg, making sure that the like units cancel

            d. First he must convert the stock to mg/ml.  Then he takes x ml X y mg/ml to obtain z ml

 

Answer: b

Explanation: He converts the stock to mg/ml, takes x ml X y mg reduced/ml = z mg, making sure that the like units cancel.

 

25. The same employee asks you to help him determine the %age of a drug solution x to y.  What do you suggest he do?

            a. Convert the solutions to parts/100 X g per 100 ml.  This will give him the conversion of mg/ml

            b. Convert the solutions to parts/100 X g per 100 mg.  This will give him the conversion of mg/ml

            c. Convert the solutions to parts 100 X mg per 100 ml.  This will give him the conversion of mg/ml

            d. Convert the solutions to parts 100 and divide by mg per 100 ml.  This will give him the conversion of mg/ml.

 

Answer: a

Explanation: Convert the solutions to parts/100 X g per 100 ml.  This will give him the conversion of mg/ml.

 

26. You are instructing a group of pharmacy students in methods of converting formulas to quantities desired.  What is the Ratio and Proportion Method?

            a. Total # in formula X total number desired

            b. Total # in formula - total number desired

            c. Total # in formula/total number desired

            d. Total # in formula + total number desired divided by 2

 

Answer: c

Explanation: The Ratio and Proportion Method is the Total # in the formula/total # desired.

 

27. You also explain the Factor Method of converting formulas to quantities desired to your students.  What is the Factor Method?

            a. Total # desired X Total # in the original formula = the Quantity Desired.  This is the Factor

            b. Total # desired/Total # in Original Formula = Factor.  To get Quantity Desired, multiply by Factor

            c. Total # in Original Formula/Total # desired = Factor.  To get Quantity Desired, multiply by Factor

            d. Total # in Original Formula X Total # Desired divided by 2 is the Factor.  To get Quantity Desired, multiply by the Factor

 

Answer: b

Explanation: Total @ desired/Total # in Original Formula = Factor.  Multiply by Factor to get quantity Desired.

 

28. You instruct your students that when they are compounding prescriptions, they should always look for three things.  What are the three things?

            a. Number of doses, period for which doses are prescribed, times of day patient should take prescription

            b. Size of doses, period for which doses are prescribed, number of doses

            c. Total amount of drug, number of doses, period for which doses are prescribed

            d. Total amount of drug, size of doses, number of doses

 

Answer: d

Explanation: When compounding always take note of the number of doses, total amount of the drug, and size of the doses.

 

29. One of the students asks you what is the formula for calculating the number of doses.  What do you answer?

            a. Size of doses/total amount of drug = # of doses

            b. Total amount of drug/size of doses = # of doses

            c. Total amount of drug – size of doses = # of doses

            d. Total amount of drug X size of doses = # of doses

 

Answer: b

Explanation: The total amount of drug/size of doses = # of doses.

 

30. Another student asks you what the formula is for calculating the total number in a container.  How do you answer her?

            a. # of doses/size of doses = total amount in container

            b. # of doses X size of doses = total amount in container

            c. # of doses – size of doses = total amount in container

            d. # of doses + size of doses divided by 3 = total amount in container

 

Answer: b

Explanation: The # of doses X the size of doses = the total amount in the container.

 

31. Another student asks you if there is a formula for calculating the size of the dose.  What do you tell her?

            a. No there is not formula for calculating size of dose

            b. Yes, there is a formula.  It is total amount of drug X # of doses = size of doses

            c. Yes there is a formula.  It is total amount of drug/# of doses = size of doses

            d. Yes, there is a formula.  It is # of doses/total amount of drug = size of doses

 

Answer: c

Explanation: The formula for calculating size of doses is total amount of drug/# of doses.

 

32. A prescription comes into the pharmacy and your employee needs to calculate a weight-in-weight percentage in order to fill it.  What is a weight-in-weight percentage?

            a. It is parts of a drug in parts of a mixture by weight

            b. It is parts of a mixture in parts of a drug by weight

            c. It is parts of a drug removed from parts of a mixture by weight

            d. It is parts of a mixture removed by weight from parts of a drug

 

Answer: a

Explanation: A weight-in-weight percentage is parts of a drug in parts of a mixture.

 

33. your employee asks you how weight-in-weight percentage is expressed.  What do you tell him?

            a. It is expressed as the number of milliliters of a drug or active ingredient in 100 milliliters of a mixture

            b. It is expressed as the number of micrograms of a drug or active ingredient in 100 grams of a mixture

            c. It is expressed as the number of grams of a drug or active ingredient in 100 grams of a mixture

            d. It is expressed as the number of grams of a drug or active ingredient in 100 grains of a mixture

 

Answer: c

Explanation: Weight-in-weight percentage is expressed as the number of grams or active ingredient in 100 grams of a mixture.

 

34. Your employee then asks you what is volume-in-volume percentage.  How do you answer him?

            a. It is the parts of a mixture removed by volume from the mixture

            b. It is the parts by volume of a part of a mixture

            c. It is the parts by volume of a mixture removed from the total mixture

            d. It is the parts by volume of a total mixture

 

Answer: d

Explanation: Volume-in-volume percentage is the parts by volume of a total mixture.

 

35. Your employee asks you how volume-in-volume percentage is expressed.  What do you tell him?

            a. It expresses the number of milliliters of a drug or active ingredient in 100 milliliters of a mixture

            b. It expresses the number of milliliters of a drug or active ingredient in 100 liters of a mixture

            c. It expresses the number of milliliters of a drug or active ingredient removed from a mixture

            d. It expresses the number of milliliters of a drug or active ingredient added into a mixture

 

Answer: a

Explanation: Volume-in-volume percentage is expressed as the number of milliliters of a drug or active ingredient in 100 milliliters of a mixture.

 

36. You’ve been given a medication by a new doctor. How can you be sure that the new medication is alright for you to take?

 

A.    It’s solely your responsibility to make sure there are no interactions or side effects with the medications that you take.

B.     Your doctor should always know if a medication will react with you; even if it is a new doctor.

C.     There is no way for you to know.

D.    The pharmacy that you use regularly will keep a Patient Medication Profile on you and they will be flagged if there is a problem with a medication.

 

Answer: D

Explanation: Your regular pharmacy will keep a database with a Patient Medication Profile. In this database such things as what medications you are currently taking and what you are allergic to is kept up to date. So, if a doctor prescribes a medication that contains an ingredient that you are allergic to, the medication is flagged and the pharmacist knows that the doctor needs to be contacted for an alternate medication.

 

37. The documentation (or chart) that a physician uses to write orders about a patient on is called the _______________?

 

A.    Patient data sheets

B.     Physicians Order Sheets

C.     Orderlies

D.    Staff Summaries

 

Answer: B

Explanation:

The Physicians Order sheets are where doctors write any notes, medications and dosages, changes in instructions, prognosis, etc. These sheets make it possible to have quick information on a patient in the hospital or nursing home.

 

38. Chewable, Enteric-coated, Sublingual, Buccal, Film-Coated, Sustained or Time-Released are types of what form of medications?

 

A.    Pellets

B.     Liquids

C.     Tablets

D.    Lozenges

 

Answer: C

Explanation: These are all types of tablets. Some come with coatings to make them easier to swallow and to make them easier on the patients system. There are chewable tablets for patients who cannot swallow a pill (i.e. children). There are time-released tablets for a constant dose over a long period of time.

 

39. Mixtures containing one or more soluble ingredient(s) dissolved usually in water and are uniformly dispersed among those of the solvent.

 

A.    Solutions

B.     Mixtures

C.     Chemicals

D.    Oxides

 

Answer: A

Explanation: Solutions are made from dissolving a solute in a solvent. The solute is mixed evenly throughout the solvent.

 

40. What is the best description for a suspension?

 

A.    A solution of a solid ingredient and a liquid.

B.     A chemical reaction of an acid and a base.

C.     Preparations containing insoluble medical products dispersed in a liquid.

D.    Preparations containing soluble medical products dispersed in a liquid.

 

Answer: C

Explanation: A suspension is a mixture of a medical product in a liquid. The term insoluble means that the medical product is not completely broken down and dispersed evenly in the liquid. This would rule out answers A and D.

 

41. The definition of an elixir is a sweetened hydroalcoholis solution that is widely used for its taste, relative stability and ease of preparation.

 

A.    True; Elixirs are water and alcohol based.

B.     True; children love taking them.

C.     False; Elixirs do not contain alcohol.

D.    False; Children will not take an elixir because of its taste.

 

Answer: A

 

Explanation: Whether or not children like taking an elixir is irrelevant to the definition, so neither answer B or D would be a best choice. Answer C is also wrong because elixirs do contain alcohol.

 

42. Susan is an asthmatic and she is having an active attack. She needs what kind of medication?

 

A.    Suppositories

B.     Ocular insert

C.     Inhaler

D.    Otic Product

 

Answer: C

Explanation: Susan needs a medication that will open up her lungs, so she needs to inhale this medication. The other three answers are used for other body parts.

 

43. Using a patient’s IV for disbursing medications and allowing the nurses to increase time for direct patient care is a type of what kind of distribution?

 

A.    Douching

B.     Centralized  Distribution

C.     Unit Dose Drug Distribution

D.    Liquid Dose Drug Distribution

 

Answer: C

Explanation: Unit dose drug distribution allows for less preparation time for nursing staff to administer medications and it increases the time for direct patient care.

 

44. Because of a demand for a high volume of prescriptions that are needed in a timely manner, “satellite” pharmacies are dispersed throughout the institution. What kind of system is this?

 

A.    Centralized Unit Dose System

B.     Decentralized Unit Dose System

C.     Congregated Unit Dose System

D.    Franchised Unit Dose System

 

Answer: B

Explanation: The definition of a decentralized unit dose system is where one or more “satellite” pharmacies are dispersed throughout the institution. Centralized is in one location and the other two are not proper names for a dose system.

 

45. ___________ refers to the notation on the medication order by a pharmacist or pharmacy technician of the name, strength and dosage form of the medication prepare for the patient.

 

  1. Coding
  2. Billing
  3. Procedures
  4. Orders

 

Answer: A

Explanation: Answer A is the definition of coding.

 

46. Sally has cleaned out her medicine cabinet. She notices that some of her medications have an expiration date on them that has passed. What should she do with these medications?

 

  1. Give them to a friend.
  2. Throw them in the trash.
  3. Properly dispose of them.
  4. Put them back in her medicine cabinet because they are still good to use.

 

Answer: C

Explanation: The expiration date lets you know when the medication can no longer be sold. It also should not be used much after this date. So she shouldn’t give them to a friend or put them back in her medicine cabinet. Most people would just throw them in the trash or flush them done the toilet. This is also not a good idea because of the impact on the environment. They are finding drugs in cities drinking water supply from improper disposal.

 

47. What is the main difference between Legend drugs and OTC drugs?

 

  1. Legend drugs have been around longer than OTC drugs.
  2. Legend drugs have to have a prescription with specific orders. The sale is limited to prescription only.
  3. OTC drugs cost less.
  4. OTC drugs need a doctor to prescribe them.

 

Answer: B

Explanation: Even though OTC drugs can be less expensive, it is not the main difference. They do not require a prescription. Legend drugs need a prescription to be able to obtain them. They are regulated and are not for sale without the prescription from the doctor.

 

48. When you call in to the doctor’s office and you require a prescription, who is not allowed to write a prescription?

 

  1. The physician
  2. Dentist
  3. Physician’s assistant
  4. Office manager

 

Answer: D

Explanation: The office manager is not allowed to write a prescription. Only the medical staff of the physician, podiatrist, physician’s assistant or nurse practitioner’s can write the prescription. The office manager can only forward the message to one of these people.

 

49. When the licensed prescriber calls in a prescription from the doctor’s office to the pharmacy, who can take the prescription?

 

  1. Anyone who answers the phone.
  2. The licensed pharmacist or pharmacy intern.
  3. The location manager.
  4. You cannot call the prescription in.

 

Answer: B

Explanation: Only the licensed pharmacist or pharmacy intern can take the prescription over the phone. If there are any questions or if the there is a flag on the patient’s records, the pharmacist can ask for an alternative medication. Only someone who has the knowledge (and license) can make sure the patient is not getting a medication that can cause a reaction for the patient.

 

50. What are the three parts of the prescription order?

 

A.    Prescriber information, medication information, hospital information

B.     Caller information, prescriber information, patient information

C.     Prescriber information, patient information, medication information

D.    Prescriber information, hospital information, medication information

 

Answer: C

Explanation: The prescription order has to have who is prescribing the medicine, who the medicine is for, and the specifics to the medicine (dosage, etc.)

 

 

51. When a prescription is being filled at the pharmacy, how can the physicians let the pharmacist know that they want the brand name medication used instead of the generic version of the medication?

 

  1. DAG
  2. DAW
  3. GNO
  4. BNO

 

Answer:

B

 

DAW is the simple code for letting the pharmacist know that the physician only wants the brand or trade name of the medication used.

 

53. Auxiliary Labels must not cover any of the ___________.

 

  1. Top of the container
  2. Prescription label
  3. Bottom of the container
  4. Open container instructions

 

Answer: B

Explanation: The auxiliary label should be placed where it is not covering any of the information on the prescription label.

 

54. Medications are commonly repackaged into unit-dose medications in these situations:

 

  1. A specific dose is not commercially available
  2. All prescriptions are repackaged no matter what
  3. Bulk repackaging is cost effective
  4. Both A and C

 

Answer: D

Explanation: Both A and D are correct. The cost is more effective in bulk and sometimes you only need to fill a prescription for 10 pills and the bottle holds 180.

 

55. Most prescriptions are written using what type of abbreviations?

 

  1. Latin
  2. Roman
  3. Greek
  4. French

 

Answer: A

Explanation: All prescriptions use the Latin form.

 

56. Pharmaceutical Latin is used in Pharmacy practice because _________________.

  1. Acts as a common language worldwide
  2. Provides a short hand method of writing
  3. Reduces the possibility of tampering with the prescription
  4. B and C
  5. All of the above

 

Answer: E

Explanation:  All of the answers are correct.

 

57. What are some advantages of tablets?

 

  1. Tastes good
  2. Compact
  3. Accuracy
  4. A and C
  5. B and C

 

Answer: E

Explanation: The advantages of tablets are compactness, portability, accuracy, convenience and lack of taste.

 

58. Which solid dosage form may never be chewed, broken or crushed prior to ingestion?

 

  1. Tablets
  2. Chewables
  3. Non-coated tablets
  4. Enteric-coated tablets

 

Answer: D

Explanation: Tablets, chewables and non-coated tablets all can be swallowed whole or made easier to swallow by chewing, breaking or crushing. The enteric-coated tablets have a special coating to help protect your system so they need to stay whole.

 

59. What are some of the advantages of Unit Drug distribution?

 

  1. Bulk supplies are easily used
  2. Errors are reduced
  3. Control over medications increases
  4. B and C
  5. All of the above

 

Answer: D

Explanation: There are six advantages of Unit Drug Distribution. Answer A is not one of the six.

 

 

60. What is/are the part(s) of the unit dose drug distribution system?

 

  1. Centralized Unit Dose System
  2. Decentralized Unit Dose System
  3. A and B
  4. All of the above
  5. None of the above

 

Answer: D

Explanation: The unit dose drug distribution system can be one or a combination of both of the centralized and decentralized systems.

 

 

61. All prescription medications are assigned what type of numbers by its manufacturer and must appear on each stock package.

 

  1. Product Bin numbers
  2. Product NDC numbers
  3. Product Supply numbers
  4. None of the above

 

Answer: B

Explanation: The product NDC numbers are assigned and must be on each stock package.

 

 

62. The first five digits of the Product NDC numbers identify ______________.

 

  1. The product name, strength and dosage form
  2. The manufacturer
  3. The package size
  4. None of the above

 

Answer: B

Explanation: The Product NDC numbers are broken down in sections:

  1. First five digits are the manufacturer
  2. The middle four digits are the product name, strength and dosage form
  3. The last two digits are the package size

 

 

63. In the Product NDC numbers the middle four indentify _____________.

 

  1. The product name, strength and dosage form
  2. The manufacturer
  3. The package size
  4. None of the above

 

Answer: A

Explanation: The Product NDC numbers are broken down in sections:

  1. First five digits are the manufacturer
  2. The middle four digits are the product name, strength and dosage form
  3. The last two digits are the package size

 

64. In the Product NDC numbers the last two digits are _____________.

 

  1. The product name, strength and dosage form

B.     The manufacturer

C.     The package size

D.    None of the above

 

Answer: C

Explanation: The Product NDC numbers are broken down in sections:

  1. First five digits are the manufacturer
  2. The middle four digits are the product name, strength and dosage form
  3. The last two digits are the package size

 

65. Which of the following is true about the medications expiration date?

 

  1. If it only shows the month and year then the drug expires the last day of the month
  2. If it only shows the month and year then the drug expires the first day of the month
  3. If the medication says it expires on 3/04 it will expire at midnight 3/31/2004
  4. A and C
  5. None of the above

 

Answer: D

Explanation: Answer B is wrong because it doesn’t expire on the first day of the month.

 

66. It is necessary to alter standard adult strengths and dosage forms for what populations?

 

  1. The pediatric populations
  2. The geriatric populations
  3. Both populations
  4. Neither population

 

Answer: C

Explanation: The standard dosage for an adult needs to be adjusted for both the pediatric and geriatric populations.

 

67. What class balance has a sensitivity requirement of 6mg?

 

  1. Class A Prescription Balances
  2. Class B Prescription Balances
  3. Class C Prescription Balances
  4. Class D Prescription Balances

 

Answer: A

Explanation: Class A prescription balances have a sensitivity requirement of 6mg.

 

 

68. What is the minimum and maximum weight for a Class A prescription balance?

  1. 100mg to 100g
  2. 110mg to 110g
  3. 120mg to 120g
  4. 130mg to 130g

 

Answer: C

Explanation: The minimum weight for a Class A prescription balance is 120 mg and the maximum is 120 g.

 

69. What balance is primarily used in place of a Class A balance in pharmacies?

  1. Digital balance
  2. Bulk balance
  3. Metric balance
  4. Standard balance

 

Answer: A

Explanation: The three types of balances are Class A, bulk and digital. The digital balance is used in place of the class A. It is sensitive to the tenth of a milligram.

 

70. To keep brass weights accurate they should:

 

  1. Be picked up by hand, in a clean state, never dented or dropped, calibrated once a year
  2. Be picked up by hand, in a clean state, never dented or dropped, calibrated once a month
  3. Be picked up by tweezers, in a clean state, it’s okay if they have been dropped, calibrated once a month
  4. Be picked up by tweezers, in a clean state, never dented or dropped, calibrated once a year

 

Answer: D

Explanation: If the weights are picked up by hand, damaged or not calibrated; then your measurements will not be accurate.

 

 

71. What are the three types of mortars?

 

  1. Brass mortars, Wedgwood mortars, Glass mortars
  2. Glass mortars, Wedgwood mortars, Porcelain mortars
  3. Ceramic mortars, Porcelain mortars, Glass mortars
  4. Porcelain mortars, Ceramic mortars, Wedgwood mortars

 

Answer: B

Explanation: The three types of mortars are Wedgwood, glass and porcelain.

 

 

72. What type of mortar is designed primarily for the user in preparing solutions and suspensions of liquid materials?

 

  1. Ceramic mortars
  2. Wedgwood mortars
  3. Glass mortars
  4. Porcelain mortars

 

Answer: C

Explanation:  Glass mortars are used for solutions and suspensions.

 

73. What type of mortar has a rough surface making them well suited for grinding crystalline substances into a fine powder?

 

  1. Ceramic mortars
  2. Wedgwood mortars
  3. Glass mortars
  4. Porcelain mortars

 

Answer: B

Explanation: Wedgwood mortars are used for grinding crystalline substances into a fine powder.

 

 

74. What type of mortar should be used for the combination of soft aggregates or crystals?

 

  1. Ceramic mortars
  2. Wedgwood mortars
  3. Glass mortars
  4. Porcelain mortars

 

Answer: D

Explanation:  Porcelain mortars can be used for both soft aggregates or crystals.

 

75. What type of spatula can bend and conform to the inner curve of the mortar?

 

  1. Hard rubber
  2. Stainless steel
  3. Plastic
  4. None of the above

 

Answer: B

Explanation: The stainless steel spatula can molded to fit the inner curve of the mortar.

 

 

76.  What drugs below can have an adverse effect causing Gynecomastia?

a.       Spirolactone

b.      Estrogens

c.       Digitails

d.      Both A and B

e.       All of the Above

 

Answer: E

Explanation: Spirolactone, Estrogens, Digitials, Cimetidine, Alcohol and Ketoconazole all may have an adverse effect causing Gynecomastia.

 

77.  Which adverse drug effect can Chloramphenicol, Aspirin, and Isoniazid all have?

a.       Diabetes

b.      Anemia

c.       Hemolytic Anemia in G6PD – deficiency

d.      None of the above

 

Answer: C

Explanation: Hemolytic Anemia in G6PD – deficiency can be caused from the following drugs; Chloramphenicol, Aspirin, Isoniazid, and Sulfonamides.